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Water levels in California reservoirs October 1, 2010

Posted by WaterWise Consulting in Water & Business, water conservation, Water Footprint, Water/Energy Connection.
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While most people know about the mandated 20% reduction in water use recently, how many people knows if this was effective or not? What is the effect of using 20% less water?
According to the California Department of Natural Resources, the water levels in eight out of twelve California reservoirs are at or above historical averages. This means that the reservoirs hold at least the same-if not more water-than the average amount they have held previously. In other words, eight out of twelve reservoirs have more water now than they have had when their prior levels are averaged.
Does this mean that we can use more water, since we have more water in the reservoirs? Definitely not. While it is undoubtedly a good sign for California water resources, it is by no means a green light to waste water. We must still conserve water because our reservoirs can only last so long before they literally dry up in the event of a drought or other natural disaster. As with any other natural resource, they are greatly influenced by natural events and as such should never be taken for granted. We should take this time as Californians to appreciate the water we have, while we still have it. Since we cannot definitively predict the future, we have no way of knowing how much water will be available in the coming years. If we drain our reservoirs now, what happens if there is not enough water available in future years?
In order to be safe, we must conserve water while we can. By lessening our impact on California’s water resources, we can together continue to thrive without worrying about where our next water supply will be.
To view information on California’s reservoir levels, please visit:
http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cdecapp/resapp/getResGraphsMain.action
Brian O’Neill
boneill@waterwise-consulting.com

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